Locks and loads: Panama’s Great Connector and Divider

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In brief: Connecting the Atlantic and Pacific was an engineering triumph, one you can see from a trip within the Canal. But it also split the country, a division of the well-off and poor still evident today. The locks of …

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High over Portugal

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How could we have missed out on Portugal in our travels all these years, and especially Lisbon? We kept asking ourselves this question during our unplanned, but leisurely stay in the capital of Lisbon, plus a week up north in …

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A Garden and Delights in Lisbon

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We took a recommendation and went to the Museu Calouste Gulbenkian, a private collection by an developer of oil fields in Iraq early in the 20th century. As befits a devoted art collector, the 6000 pieces he accumulated (his “children” …

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Gone off: Mozambique’s divided old ports

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In brief: Two towns, split between colonialists and natives, long served as key African ports. Despite years of decline, both still tell the past and foretell better futures… They were vital ports once, both developed by invaders on sheltered islands …

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Underwater world along Mozambique’s coast

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South Africans know it. Portuguese know it. Increasingly, other Europeans are discovering it. The 2500 kilometer long coast line along the Indian Ocean is a natural and tourist treasure. In the south, the coast around Tofo offer limitless sandy bays, …

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Road Hogs – and Chickens – of the N1

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National route N1, the principal and just about the only highway through Mozambique, curls north from the coasts of the south toward the highlands in the west before again cutting back to the coast. There it delivers you to the …

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Maputo’s Surprising Style

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At the heart of Maputo, the capital city of Mozambique, stands a bronze statue of Samora Machel, the country’s socialist revolutionary hero and first President. From the elliptical Praça de Independencia, he hails or blesses the people like a Comrade …

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Spirits that Dance – Malawi rock art & rituals

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Ten thousand years ago, in a region where currently Mozambique, Zambia and Malawi meet, members of the Batwa pygmy tribe recorded important features of their life on the rock walls of their shelters. Unlike other early tribes of Europe, where …

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Africa in miniature – Malawi’s diverse south

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Most people think…central Africa, grasslands, savanna, big animals. Southern Malawi had its share of this. Though other countries might get the headlines for big animal wildlife, you can still see plenty in this small country…and besides you can never see …

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Malawian Forest Tales

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“You should go there,” a local suggested, “it’s a unique place in Malawi.” We had already experienced the lows and highs here. The heat-soaked grasslands and bush country of Majete and Liwonde where the wild animals roam free; the looming …

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